Grumpy Cat: The Modern Achilles

Or,

How Memes are Actually Classical Tradition and How Publishers Are Killing Them Regardless

 

N.B. In the context of this essay, ‘meme’ refers specifically to internet memes and oral tradition refers specifically to that of the Ancient Greeks.

How could an unhappy looking cat be comparable to the greatest Greek hero? Achilles and Grumpy Cat are much more similar than they first appear. They come from traditions, Ancient Greek oral tradition and internet memes respectively, that are mirror images of each other.  Continue reading “Grumpy Cat: The Modern Achilles”

Country Mouse Don’t Need No Web Cheddar: Why Local Rural Print Newspapers Are Survivors

Print is dying. Newspapers are dead. The world has gone digital. This is what Internet intellectuals like Clay Shirky believe. Essentially, they believe that everyone should face the facts, embrace the digital age, and stop hoping that print will survive. But what about the print that continues to survive? That continues to thrive? Print that either ignores digital advancements or only embraces them half-heartedly. Shirky is only correct in saying the unthinkable (that newspapers are dead) when it comes to publications that cater to tech-savvy urbanites who access media using various non-print platforms; people who may want the local news, but who get it easily from their online sources. These newspapers are hoping that digital facelifts will be enough to compete in the age of the net.

But local rural newspapers don’t yet have to face this threat, and may be immune for years to come. In the modern age, when people are turning to the web for their news, and urban print newspapers are dying, local rural newspapers are still proving viable. This is the case for a few reasons: people are inherently more interested in news that directly affects them, and want that inside, credible scoop; local rural newspapers that have launched digital platforms have been met with a lukewarm response; rural populations are largely people over the age of fifty who are not all willing to consume information from the web; and print newspapers continue to be filled with advertisements. Continue reading “Country Mouse Don’t Need No Web Cheddar: Why Local Rural Print Newspapers Are Survivors”